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everyframeapainting:

A Brief Look at Texting and the Internet in Film
Cuz there’s gotta be a better way to show this.

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(Source: jchthys, via philsandifer)

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rottentomatoes:

mattystanfield:

"Maybe I’ll just sit here and bleed at you."

BRICK

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Rian Johnson | 2005

Steve Yedlin | Cinematography

Certified Fresh at 80%

(via filmnoirandfemmefatales)

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vintagecrimeblacklizard:

The Red Riding Quartet by David Peace

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philsandifer:

The Onion has launched a Buzzfeed competitor, and it may be the most beautifully nihilistic thing ever.

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When I see a student on Facebook during class

teacherthoughtbubble:

I wanna be all like:

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lareviewofbooks:

"If it seems strange to think about the emphatically adult-programming TV show Game of Thrones in conjunction with an essay about Young Adult novels, I don’t think it should. The question is about genre and sophistication; if we could read very very generously, we might see, in Graham’s essay, the claim that our culture requires sophisticated discernment in its adults, discernment these adults will develop by reading complex, morally-ambiguous stories and will not develop by indulging in escapist, simplistic, and predictable genre texts. I’m not swayed by the argument, but staging it this way, we can see how she might have, logically speaking, written about fantasy rather than YA; fantasy, too, is a genre often disparaged as formulaic and immature. And the pleasures of YA are very similar to the pleasures of fantasy.”
Sarah Mesle on Game of Thrones, Season 4: “The Watchers on the Wall”

lareviewofbooks:

"If it seems strange to think about the emphatically adult-programming TV show Game of Thrones in conjunction with an essay about Young Adult novels, I don’t think it should. The question is about genre and sophistication; if we could read very very generously, we might see, in Graham’s essay, the claim that our culture requires sophisticated discernment in its adults, discernment these adults will develop by reading complex, morally-ambiguous stories and will not develop by indulging in escapist, simplistic, and predictable genre texts. I’m not swayed by the argument, but staging it this way, we can see how she might have, logically speaking, written about fantasy rather than YA; fantasy, too, is a genre often disparaged as formulaic and immature. And the pleasures of YA are very similar to the pleasures of fantasy.”

Sarah Mesle on Game of Thrones, Season 4: “The Watchers on the Wall”

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Jackson Mathews, To Whitman
The Partisan Review Online
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pickledelephant:

Stanley Kubrick with his sister Barbara.

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vintagecrimeblacklizard:

"Because of you. The city is a coffin. In the snow. In the back of a truck. Parked outside the bank. In the sleet. Under the heavy damp tarpaulin. Driven through the streets. In the rain. To the hospital. To the morgue. In the sleet. To the mortuary. To the temple. In the snow. To the crematorium. To the earth and to the sky –" —from OCCUPIED CITY by David Peace On January 26, 1948, a man posing as a public health official arrives at a bank in Tokyo. He explains that he’s there to treat everyone who might have been exposed to a recent outbreak of dysentery. Soon after drinking the medicine he administers, twelve employees are dead, four are unconscious, and the “official” has fled. Twelve voices tell the story of the murder from different perspectives including a journalist, a gangster-turned-businessman, an “occult detective,” and a well-known painter. Each voice enlarges and deepens the portrait of a city and a people making their way out of a war-induced hell. Told with David Peace’s brilliantly idiosyncratic and mesmerizing voice, Occupied City is a stunningly audacious work from a singular writer. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/xFb14

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

"Because of you. The city is a coffin. In the snow. In the back of a truck. Parked outside the bank. In the sleet. Under the heavy damp tarpaulin. Driven through the streets. In the rain. To the hospital. To the morgue. In the sleet. To the mortuary. To the temple. In the snow. To the crematorium. To the earth and to the sky –"
—from OCCUPIED CITY by David Peace

On January 26, 1948, a man posing as a public health official arrives at a bank in Tokyo. He explains that he’s there to treat everyone who might have been exposed to a recent outbreak of dysentery. Soon after drinking the medicine he administers, twelve employees are dead, four are unconscious, and the “official” has fled. Twelve voices tell the story of the murder from different perspectives including a journalist, a gangster-turned-businessman, an “occult detective,” and a well-known painter. Each voice enlarges and deepens the portrait of a city and a people making their way out of a war-induced hell. Told with David Peace’s brilliantly idiosyncratic and mesmerizing voice, Occupied City is a stunningly audacious work from a singular writer. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/xFb14